Fear

It serves a good purpose in the right context. Fear of being flattened by a semi prevents me from texting while driving.  I consider this fear to be healthy.

And yet, I am aware of the destruction unhealthy fear can wreak on a life.

Fear is the root of anxiety, worry, stress, and busyness.  The blocker of vulnerability, honesty, humility, and ultimately: intimacy.

Fear. The absence of trust.

What do you fear? Do you fear not mattering? Falling behind? Failing? Being alone? Rejection? Being hurt again? I see folks who fear crying because they may not be able to stop. We fear losing control. We fear our own emotions and other people’s, too! We fear sharing who we really are. We fear other people’s opinion of us.

I urge you to try and understand your fears, because only then will you be able to talk to yourself  (and others) with more with love and logic. After all, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself, right? (thanks, FDR!)

Some tips for discovering your fear:

–       Write down how you spend your time

–       Write down who and what matter most

–       Does your time and energy accurately reflect what you value most?

  • If it does, awesome–keep up the good work! Balance is a continual journey.
  • If not, why not? Is there a fear that holds you back? I understand bills must still be paid, but is there anything you can change or do to have your life reflect your values more?

We are not guaranteed tomorrow. And so I ask you, what would you do differently if you weren’t afraid? Who or what would you stop wasting your energy on? Who would you apologize to, forgive, or make time for? Who would you call? Hug? Thank? Share your feelings with?

Check out this amazing article written by a nurse about the top 5 regrets of the dying.

If it doesn’t change your life, read it again.

Victory!

Victory!

Love,

Lauren

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true beauty

In the award winning children’s novel, “A Wrinkle in Time,” the main character, Meg is trying to explain seeing to a creature from another world:

“Well, it’s what things look like,” Meg said helplessly.“We do not know what things look like, as you say,” the beast said. “We know what things are like. It must be a very limiting thing, this seeing.”

After reading this, I spent several minutes soaking in the depth and truth of this passage. Now, don’t get me wrong. I am so grateful for my sight! I love being able to see my family and friends, to be able to read, and having my breath taken away by the beauty of a sunset reflecting on the water…but I am very aware of the limitations that seeing presents, such as:

Judging others based on the way they look or dress. We are limited when we miss the opportunity to know someone special because of the way he or she looks. We are limited when we allow ourselves to feel ugly in comparison to models and movie stars. We are limited when we focus on perfecting what we see in the mirror, instead of perfecting who we are.

Since I wouldn’t wish away my vision and I’m sure you wouldn’t either, I propose we try this: let’s try living in an awareness that beauty is fleeting and has been distorted. And most importantly: it really is what is inside that counts.

If you haven’t already seen this amazing video on beauty distorted, check it out: